Tag Archives: Minako Hamano

Mario Kart: Super Circuit, Game Boy Advance

This handheld version of Mario Kart was developed by Intelligent Systems and published by Nintendo on the Game Boy Advance in 2001, and it is quite wonderful to play! Like pretty much every Mario Kart game ever made… What’s not to like about them?

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Metroid: Zero Mission, Game Boy Advance

There are two Metroid games on the Game Boy Advance. One is an original game, called Metroid Fusion, and there’s also this one: Metroid: Zero Mission, which is a remake of the original Metroid.

It was first released in 2004 and features modernised graphics and gameplay, but the same core gameplay as the 1986 original.

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The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening DX, Game Boy Color

The Game Boy Color has a brilliant remake of The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening. It was first released in 1998 and features an added colour-themed dungeon not seen in the original monochrome release.

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The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening, Game Boy

The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening (1993) is like a mini version of the Super Nintendo classic A Link To The Past (1991) – both games share more than just the same DNA. At times Link’s Awakening feels like A Link To The Past without colour. Which is a huge compliment because A Link To The Past is one of the best games ever made. This, too, is among the best Game Boy games of all time.

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Metroid Fusion, Game Boy Advance

Also known as “Metroid 4“, Metroid Fusion on the Game Boy Advance is the fourth episode in the famous run-and-gun series from Nintendo and was first released in 2002.

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Super Metroid, Super Nintendo

The third game in the Metroid series is a top class Super Nintendo classic.

Super Metroid (1994) is more detailed than both previous Metroid games put together, although the basic structure is the same – explore various levels to find your latent abilities, all of which have been lost (“Why does this keep happening in Metroid games?” you may ask. “It’s in the script,” is my answer).

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