Tag Archives: chibi

Final Fantasy Legend III, Game Boy

As Final Fantasy Legend games go this third instalment in the series is a little weird. It plays just as good as the previous two games (maybe even better because it has the advantage of refinement), but the way it’s presented is somewhat strange.

Final Fantasy Legend III‘s designers decided to use a kind of ‘modular’ or ‘sticker’ design look for the enemies that you see during battle, and when you’re facing off against them they look kinda funny… I guess that was the intention, although the change of style results in a bizarre-looking game rather than a scary one. You might be asking “What could be scary about a game like this?” and I would simply point to Su-Zaku in the first game – an indestructible fiery bird capable of drawing terror from all who encounter it… But the monsters in this just look googly-eyed and daft. It’s a pity because I loved the look of the first two games.

Final Fantasy Legend III is a fine JRPG though, and it does a few things new in the series that give the game an extra dimension. Firstly: you can jump over holes in this third game, which is new. Jumping was not something that was allowed in previous games, and it might seem quite minor, but it allows for different puzzles to solve. Secondly: this time your party members can eat the meat dropped by slain monsters, which transforms them into different races, each with unique abilities and powers. While the meat-eating element does add another layer of interest to Final Fantasy Legend III it’s not obvious which races are most useful in which situations, so unless you have a chart to refer to you’ll be flying blind. There is one in the manual, but it’s a bit of a beast… [pun intended].

Another cool feature of Final Fantasy Legend III is The Talon – a legendary time-travelling spaceship that you acquire some distance into the game. You must collect a number of upgrade units to make it battle-ready, but when you do you can fly around the game world, shoot enemies with it, and get in and out of it at will. It’s worth persevering with Final Fantasy Legend III to at least get The Talon upgraded. 🙂

Final Fantasy Legend series on The King of Grabs:
Final Fantasy Legend, Final Fantasy Legend II, Final Fantasy Legend III

More: Final Fantasy Legend III on Wikipedia

Final Fantasy VI Advance, Game Boy Advance

Final Fantasy VI Advance was released in Japan in 2006, and 2007 in English language territories. It’s a remake of the Super Nintendo original, developed by a Japanese company called Tose.

It has to be said: Tose did a great job with the remakes, and this final, fourth release cements that fact. The 4:3 screen ratio of the original has been replaced by the 240×160 widescreen ratio of the Game Boy Advance, which means that the graphics have been re-drawn and re-scaled to fit the new screen ratio. They’re essentially the same, though, with some colour enhancements. The story, plot, and other original elements all remain the same.

The best enhancement in Final Fantasy VI Advance is the menu system, which is fast, compact, and easy to navigate. It actually makes the original looked dated and shows you the power of good fonts and text alignment.

Again: if you want to play the early Final Fantasy games – including this one – I’d recommend the GBAAdvance” remakes over the SNES originals. Together they make a brilliant set.

Final Fantasy Advance remakes on The King of Grabs:
Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of SoulsFinal Fantasy IV AdvanceFinal Fantasy V Advance, Final Fantasy VI Advance

More: Final Fantasy VI on Wikipedia

100 Best Level-Grinders Of All-Time
100 Best Level-Grinders Of All-Time

Final Fantasy V Advance, Game Boy Advance

Final Fantasy V Advance is the third Tose-developed remake for the Game Boy Advance and was first released in 2006.

Again: it uses the same refined interface and beautifully-drawn and coloured graphics of the previous two Tose remakes and somehow manages to make the Super Nintendo original look a little drab in the process.

Story-wise: all you need to know is that you play a guy called Bartz and your mission is to stop an evil sorcerer from breaking the four seals that hold her.

An extensive “job system” (as initially seen in Final Fantasy III) allows customisation of playable characters, and Final Fantasy V has been rightly praised for its customisation features – it helps keep the game interesting.

Given the choice I would play this over the SNES original, because it’s quicker, and because it looks better. And because the English translation is official, and obviously much better than the unofficial fan translations found littering the internet.

Final Fantasy Advance remakes on The King of Grabs:
Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of SoulsFinal Fantasy IV Advance, Final Fantasy V Advance, Final Fantasy VI Advance

More: Final Fantasy V Advance on Wikipedia

100 Best Level-Grinders Of All-Time
100 Best Level-Grinders Of All-Time

Final Fantasy V, Super Nintendo

Final Fantasy V (five) was released in Japan for the Super Nintendo in 1992 although it did not get an official English language translation until it was later re-released on the Sony PlayStation in 1999.

Which has led to a variety of fan translations appearing to fill that gap. I think the one shown here is an unofficial English translation, because the text looks a bit dodgy to me… Square wouldn’t have used such large, chunky text in an official release. It just looks unprofessional…

Unfortunately this is what you have to accept if you want to play the game in English on a Super Nintendo. Either that or you could instead play Final Fantasy V on the Game Boy Advance (which is the superior version in my humble opinion), or iOS, Android, or Windows, which I believe it’s also been converted to.

In spite of Final Fantasy V never having been released in the West, it did manage to sell over two million physical copies in Japan. Which is a pretty big middle finger to those who decided it wasn’t worth translating (“Yeah! That’ll show ’em!“).

More: Final Fantasy V on Wikipedia

Final Fantasy IV Advance, Game Boy Advance

In the mid Noughties Japanese developer Tose undertook the task of converting and updating the early Final Fantasy games to the Nintendo Game Boy Advance for Square Enix (as they were known then).

I’ve already written about the first two – released in 2004 as Dawn of Souls – and I believe they didn’t bother with the third – going straight on to Final Fantasy IV (four), then releasing five and six in quick succession. Making four releases and five games in total. All four releases use the same game engine and graphical interface and could be considered “a set”.

This fourth Final Fantasy remake came out in 2005 and follows on from Dawn of Souls beautifully. To play it feels like a refined and detailed Final Fantasy Legend, with cute characters and colourful, beautifully-drawn backdrops. If you compare it next to the Super Nintendo original it certainly looks better – the Game Boy Advance‘s extended colour palette gives the game much more vibrancy and depth.

The story is nothing to write home about, but if you want hardcore, old school, turn-based level-grinding – Final Fantasy IV Advance is one of the best handheld RPGs around. In fact: all four of those Tose Final Fantasy remakes are worth a play if you can find them.

Final Fantasy Advance remakes on The King of Grabs:
Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of Souls, Final Fantasy IV Advance, Final Fantasy V AdvanceFinal Fantasy VI Advance

More: Final Fantasy IV Advance on Wikipedia