Tag Archives: Boss Battles

Resident Evil 5, PC

The first in the Resident Evil series to feature simultaneous cooperative play, Resident Evil 5 (2009) is a somewhat strange (but interesting) instalment that takes place in Africa.

This time you’re up against a virus, a corrupt corporation, local ‘zombie’ thugs, and black magic and superstition as well. All in broad daylight too, as the first part of the game seems to take every opportunity to kick you outdoors into the blazing sunshine (as though the developers were insisting that this episode would all be set outdoors, because we’d all been sat indoors playing games for too long in the dark).

What Resident Evil 5 loses in atmosphere it makes up for in action, with a fine control system making for some satisfying combat (headshots in particular are neat in this), and some fairly chilling enemies, sieges and bosses to defeat along the way.

Resident Evil 5 has also been accused of being racist, but I think that’s hogwash. It’s just a different setting. An unusual one, but one that works well, feels authentic, and makes you feel uncomfortable, which is a welcome feeling in an ocean of generic shoot ’em ups.

Resident Evil series on The King of Grabs:
Resident Evil HD Remaster, PC
Resident Evil 2, PlayStation
Resident Evil 3: Nemesis, PlayStation
Resident Evil 4, GameCube
Resident Evil 4 Ultimate HD Edition, PC
Resident Evil 5, PC
Resident Evil 6, PC
Resident Evil, Game Boy Color
Resident Evil – Code: Veronica, Dreamcast
Resident Evil Zero, GameCube

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resident_Evil_5
Steam: Resident Evil 5 on Steam

Resident Evil 4, GameCube

Resident Evil 4 – THE standout survival horror game of the Noughties – was released exclusively by Capcom on the Nintendo GameCube in 2005, and it immediately became a critical and commercial smash hit. For all the right reasons.

The traditional zombie approach has been tweaked slightly, and this time you’re battling with weird Eastern European villagers and some super scary sub-bosses.

Resident Evil 4 has memorable moment after memorable moment, whether it’s fighting El Gigante, or having your throat torn out by zombie wolves – the action is relentless.

Those disgusting tentacles that spurt out of decapitated heads are a sight for sore eyes too.

Resident Evil 4 is a must-play game for all gamers. Except small children and people of a nervous disposition…

Resident Evil series on The King of Grabs:
Resident Evil HD Remaster, PC
Resident Evil 2, PlayStation
Resident Evil 3: Nemesis, PlayStation
Resident Evil 4, GameCube
Resident Evil 4 Ultimate HD Edition, PC
Resident Evil 5, PC
Resident Evil 6, PC
Resident Evil, Game Boy Color
Resident Evil – Code: Veronica, Dreamcast
Resident Evil Zero, GameCube

More: Resident Evil 4 on Wikipedia
Steam: Resident Evil 4 HD Remaster on Steam

Resident Evil 3: Nemesis, PlayStation

The sequel to the great Resident Evil 2 is a great continuation of the survival horror series, this time with you playing as Jill Valentine, and fighting against a persistent superboss who jumps into the story at certain points to give you a pasting.

Or – if you give it a pasting back – you get a reward.

Resident Evil 3: Nemesis is less about teamwork and more about unlockables.

If you complete the main story, a minigame (called “Mercenaries“) is unlocked, and this minigame is just as much fun as the main game, if not more!

Actually, Capcom realised that Mercenaries was such a hit that it made it available from the beginning in all its subsequent releases and conversions of Resident Evil 3.

Resident Evil 3 is more of the same from Capcom. In fact: this game revisits some of the locations from the second game from exactly the same angles. The crossover works well though, and the intervening, titular ‘Nemesis’ boss character helps ramp up the tension. You know he’s coming. You just don’t know when…

Resident Evil series on The King of Grabs:
Resident Evil HD Remaster, PC
Resident Evil 2, PlayStation
Resident Evil 3: Nemesis, PlayStation
Resident Evil 4, GameCube
Resident Evil 4 Ultimate HD Edition, PC
Resident Evil 5, PC
Resident Evil 6, PC
Resident Evil, Game Boy Color
Resident Evil – Code: Veronica, Dreamcast
Resident Evil Zero, GameCube

More: Resident Evil 3: Nemesis on Wikipedia

 

Resident Evil 2, PlayStation

Capcom‘s Resident Evil 2 really elevated the survival horror genre to great heights, way back in 1998 when it was first released.

Mostly because it was more gritty and serious than the first game, but also because it was a much more complex storyline in this one: with two different characters playing the same scenario, but from different perspectives (and provided on two different CD-ROMs). Effectively giving you two games in one. So you play one character on a ‘A’ game, and the other on a ‘B’ game, by loading your save in from having completed one half of the game.

And the actions of one character in the game have an effect on what the second character experiences in their game later.

This – in itself – is a dazzling feature, but there is so much more to Resident Evil 2 than that.

The only real downside is that the original Resident Evil 2 graphics are looking a bit dated these days, but that’s what happens when you use pre-rendered graphics at 640×480 (PAL standard) resolution, and blow them up to high definition.

But that doesn’t really matter here because the game is so good. As an atmospheric survival horror game, there are few titles around that can beat Resident Evil 2 in terms of entertainment and variety.

Resident Evil series on The King of Grabs:
Resident Evil HD Remaster, PC
Resident Evil 2, PlayStation
Resident Evil 3: Nemesis, PlayStation
Resident Evil 4, GameCube
Resident Evil 4 Ultimate HD Edition, PC
Resident Evil 5, PC
Resident Evil 6, PC
Resident Evil, Game Boy Color
Resident Evil – Code: Veronica, Dreamcast
Resident Evil Zero, GameCube

More: Resident Evil 2 on Wikipedia

Super Mario Sunshine, GameCube

Games-players will always argue among themselves about which is the greatest “retro” Mario game of all time.

For me it is a toss-up between Super Mario Sunshine (2002) and Super Mario World (1990) on the SNES.

Super Mario Sunshine is the 3D game; Super Mario World the 2D game.

And, personally, I think that Super Mario Sunshine is much better than Super Mario 64, because the GameCube‘s graphical power makes for a much more finessed experience. And also because the F.L.U.D.D. water jet is such a unique and fun gameplay device as to make this stand out from the other Mario games.

Sunshine is more challenging too – getting attuned to the controls, and jumping around in 3D space is a real test.

But what makes Super Mario Sunshine so great is the attention to detail. Nintendo always lavish layers of detail on their Mario games and Super Mario Sunshine is one of the densest Mario games ever made. It is so much fun, exploring, and unlocking new areas.

Graphically – although Super Mario Sunshine comes from the era of standard definition graphics – it’s still a beautifully constructed and coloured game, and a delight to the eyes.

You’d be hard pushed to find a better game on the GameCube.

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Mario_Sunshine

Etrian Odyssey III: The Drowned City, Nintendo DS [Part 2]

I want to post some more grabs from Etrian Odyssey III: The Drowned City on the Nintendo DS. Because it really is one of the best RPGs of all time, and because I can’t recommend you play it highly enough.

In my mind, developer Atlus took all of the best elements of computer Role-Playing Gaming over the past twenty years, and rolled them into this game.

Etrian Odyssey III is not perfect, however, but it’s as close to level-grinding nirvana on a console as you can get. And – having played Etrian Odyssey 1 & 2 before this, and seeing its potential – Atlus must be commended for realising that potential in this game.

The (quite wonderful) stylus/mouse-based mapping element is worth the price of admission alone. But there’s so much more to this game. The craft, quality and detail are joyous to experience, although Etrian Odyssey III is a very tough game.

I’ve not yet managed to beat the three (four actually) dragons at the end, but have otherwise been absorbed for months at a time playing this game. The combat is so good. A great example of how timings and interface make for great combat. And variety. There’s just so much variety in this game, but it’s not out of control, and Etrian Odyssey III feels like a great console game.

Etrian Odyssey III is a great console game. One of the greatest!

I’ve prepared some new grabs to show off Etrian Odyssey III‘s detail a bit more (my last post about this game I think I only posted five grabs). And remember: this is a dual-screen game (top and bottom screens). I’ve cropped most shots down to one screen, but the taller grabs are two screens on top of each other. Enjoy.

More on The King of Grabs:
Etrian Odyssey, Etrian Odyssey II, Etrian Odyssey III

More: Etrian Odyssey III: The Drowned City on Wikipedia