Tag Archives: Non-violent

Do-Re-Mi Fantasy, Super Nintendo

Published in Japan by Hudson Soft in 1996, Do-Re-Mi Fantasy is a cute and colourful platform game that is actually the sequel to the Famicom game Milon’s Secret Castle.

Do-Re-Mi Fantasy doesn’t really look like Milon’s Secret Castle – or play like it for that matter – but it does share the same bubble-blowing DNA as its predecessor.

Continue reading Do-Re-Mi Fantasy, Super Nintendo

Kikstart, Commodore 16/Plus4

Shaun Southern‘s Commodore 16 version of his hit bike game, Kikstart, is somewhat different to the original Commodore 64 version.

Continue reading Kikstart, Commodore 16/Plus4

Pikmin, GameCube

Pikmin was released for the Nintendo GameCube in 2001 and was an instant hit with gamers.

Designed and produced by Shigeru Miyamoto, the first game in the Pikmin series introduces Captain Oilmar, an alien who crash lands on a mysterious planet and where he befriends small creatures called Pikmin who help him rebuild his ship.

Continue reading Pikmin, GameCube

Track & Field, Game Boy

Konami‘s 1992 conversion of the smash arcade hit Track & Field features more events than the original. In fact, it’s something of a mashup of Track & Field and its famous follow-up Hyper Sports.

Continue reading Track & Field, Game Boy

Kikstart, Commodore 64

Less successful than its sequel (and arguably less enjoyable too), Kikstart was written by Shaun Southern and published by Mastertonic in 1985.

Continue reading Kikstart, Commodore 64

Mr. Wimpy, Oric

It could be argued that the Oric version of Mr. Wimpy is better than the ZX Spectrum version. It does look slightly better graphically, but I think that a more diplomatic solution would be to say that both are as bad as each other…

Continue reading Mr. Wimpy, Oric

Mr. Wimpy, ZX Spectrum

Mr. Wimpy is an early ZX Spectrum game from Ocean Software, first published in 1984. It is based on (and licensed from) the Wimpy chain of restaurants – in particular their mascot: Mr. Wimpy. Wimpy restaurants were more widespread in the 1980s than they are today, but this was still a surprising release from Ocean.

Continue reading Mr. Wimpy, ZX Spectrum