Tag Archives: The King of Grabs

Sega Megadrive/Genesis Special

Known as the Megadrive in Japan and Europe, and the Genesis in North America, this was Sega‘s fourth generation home video games console and it was launched in 1988 in Japan (1989 in North America and 1990 in Europe).

The Megadrive/Genesis is a 16-bit console with a built-in slot for cartridges, which is how most games were played on it. It had backwards compatibility with its predecessor, the Sega Master System, and it also had a variety of important add-ons released for it, including the Sega CD and the 32X.

The unit came with two standard, three-button pads, then later (after Street Fighter II came out on the Megadrive) six button pads (like the one picture below) became more widespread.

The Megadrive sold more than 30 millions units worldwide, until it was discontinued by Sega in 1997 (although it was still being sold and supported by Majesco Entertainment until 1999).

Sega‘s console has a huge library of superb games and many are still being re-released to this day. So here’s our tribute to Sega‘s classic machine with a week of nothing but Megadrive games.

Here’s a full list of what was published:

Desert Strike
Jungle Strike
Urban Strike
Gunstar Heroes
Road Rash 3
The Immortal
Mega Bomberman
MUSHA
Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle
Herzog Zwei
Flashback
Pier Solar and the Great Architects
Castlevania: Bloodlines
Toejam & Earl
Cosmic Spacehead
Phantasy Star III

Enjoy,
The King of Grabs

More: Megadrive/Genesis on Wikipedia

Megadrive Pad 2

Mega Drive Wide

Sega Genesis Wide

Game Boy Advance Special

The Nintendo Game Boy Advance is a 32-bit handheld video game console that was first launched in 2001 and went on to become a best-seller. Ultimately selling over 80 million physical units worldwide, until its discontinuation in 2010.

The GBA, as it is affectionately known, is renowned for being both versatile and powerful. In fact, many people refer to it as a “Super Nintendo in your hands” although the technical truth is a little more complicated than that.

It is, though, a very capable games machine and over its lifetime had a multitude of classic games released for it.

The Game Boy Advance screen resolution is only 240 x 160 pixels, with 32,000 colours available on-screen at once, but many developers managed to make the machine feel bigger than it actually was. Personally, I put the GBA up into my top five games console of all-time, because it has such a fantastic library of great games.

The GBA also has backwards compatibility with the original Game Boy, and Game Boy Color, so the choice of software available for the system is pretty mind-boggling.

The GBA also had a number of variations made during its lifetime, including the Game Boy Advance SP (SP meaning “Special”) which had a clamshell (or ‘laptop’ style) folding screen, and the Game Boy Micro (a smaller, lighter version of the GBA, but without the backward compatibility).

This week I’m going to be publishing grabs and write-ups of some of my favourite Game Boy Advance games.

Here’s a list of what was published:

Advance Wars
Metroid: Zero Mission
Defender of the Crown
Mario Kart: Super Circuit
The Pinball of the Dead
Car Battler Joe
Castlevania: Circle of the Moon
Castlevania: Harmony Of Dissonance
Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow
Super Monkey Ball Jr.
Bruce Lee: Return of the Legend
Sabre Wulf
Mario vs. Donkey Kong
Mario Golf: Advance Tour
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgames!

I hope you enjoy,
The King of Grabs

More: Game Boy Advance on Wikipedia

Game-Boy-Advance-2-Wide

Sony PSP Special

This week I’ve decided to focus on games for the PlayStation Portable (PSP) – the handheld video game console from Sony that really pushed the envelope in terms of graphical capabilities. It first came out in 2004 in Japan and 2005 everywhere else.

The PSP played host to a number of amazing games over its lifetime and it still has many fans to this day. The games are still readily available, even if they’re not really being made commercially any more, and better emulators are becoming more prevalent so the PSP is being rediscovered by a whole new generation of gamers.

So here’s our tribute to the PlayStation Portable and the games that can be played on it. Long may they be appreciated!

Here are links to what was published:

Ultimate Ghosts ‘N Goblins
Wipeout Pure
Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII
Tekken: Dark Resurrection
Mega Man Powered Up
Jeanne d’Arc
Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories
Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles
Ape Escape: On The Loose
Gran Turismo
Little Big Planet
Patapon 3
Everybody’s Golf Portable 2

Enjoy!
The King of Grabs

More: Sony PSP on Wikipedia

Amiga CD32 Special

The CD32 is a CD-ROM-based console that is basically a high-end Amiga contained within a small, grey box. It can do pretty much everything an Amiga can do, but with a few built-in extras, such as Red Book Audio (CD quality sound, streamed from the disc), CDTV compatibility, and backwards compatibility with older, 9-pin D-Sub (Atari-style) controllers of the ’80s and ’90s (including Sega Megadrive pads and existing Amiga mice and paddles).

Continue reading Amiga CD32 Special

Tony Crowther Week

Born in Sheffield in 1965, Antony Crowther is a prolific and highly-regarded British video games designer/programmer who has had success across a number of different platforms.

Crowther is particularly well known for his Commodore 64 games, although he has worked on pretty much every gaming system known to man. He still designs and programs games to this day.

Continue reading Tony Crowther Week

Commodore 16/Plus4 Special

The Commodore 16 is a somewhat underrated home computer that had a relatively short lifespan and was intended as a low-cost replacement for the Commodore VIC-20.

It had 16K of RAM (thus the name) and a 6502 compatible CPU that ran twice as fast as the CPU in its older and more expensive cousin, the Commodore 64. It had a video and sound chipset called “TED” that offered a colour palette of 121 colours, and more efficient use of video memory than the C64, but it had no hardware sprites (it did however have a built-in software sprite routine with fewer restrictions than on hardware sprites).

Continue reading Commodore 16/Plus4 Special

Bad Games Week #2 Ends

Bad Games Week #2 has now ended.

[“Phew!” you’re probably thinking.]

Here’s a summary of links to what was published:

Chuck Norris Superkicks, ColecoVision,
Cap’n’ Carnage, Atari ST,
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Atari 2600,
The Evil Dead, Commodore 64,
Trevor McFur in the Crescent Galaxy, Atari Jaguar,
Kung-Fu Master, ZX Spectrum,
Jail Break, Commodore 64.

Back to *GOOD GAMES* from this point onward! 🙂

Thank you!
The King of Grabs

Bad Games Week #2

It’s time for another celebration of bad video games on The King of Grabs!

Every game featured on the blog this week is guaranteed NOT to be in your top ten. These are some of the worst video games ever made…

From today onward there will be one sh*te game per day, and we will be returning back to normal in seven days from now. When it’s all over I’ll post a full list of what was published here.

Here’s a summary of links to what was published:

Chuck Norris Superkicks, ColecoVision,
Cap’n’ Carnage, Atari ST,
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Atari 2600,
The Evil Dead, Commodore 64,
Trevor McFur in the Crescent Galaxy, Atari Jaguar,
Kung-Fu Master, ZX Spectrum,
Jail Break, Commodore 64.

Oh, and here’s a link to the last Bad Games Week, in case you’re a connoisseur of terrible video games and want more.

Enjoy!
The King of Grabs