Tag Archives: 1982

The Hobbit, ZX Spectrum

Written by Philip Mitchell and Veronika Megler, The Hobbit is a legendary text adventure, with graphics, that was published by Melbourne House in 1982.

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Super Locomotive, Arcade

An original arcade release from Sega in 1982, Super Locomotive is a side-scrolling action game where you must guide a train from one station to the next, while at the same time avoiding obstacles and other trains trying to shunt you off the track.

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Bump ‘n’ Jump, Arcade

Data East‘s 1982 arcade release, Bump ‘n’ Jump (aka Burnin’ Rubber in its native Japan), is a jolly, vertically-scrolling driving game with a car that can jump up into the air for a few seconds to avoid gaps in the road.

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Millipede, Arcade

Millipede is a direct sequel to Atari‘s Centipede and was first distributed into video game arcades in 1982.

It’s basically the same trackball-controlled gameplay as before, but with a few changes and enhancements.

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Horace Goes Skiing, ZX Spectrum

Hungry Horace author, William Tang, also produced this sequel – Horace Goes Skiing – the same year as its predecessor: 1982. It was again published by Sinclair/Psion.

This one is part Frogger clone and part skiing game, and is slightly more playable and enjoyable than its predecessor.

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E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Atari 2600

This notorious 1982 release for the Atari 2600 was – at the time – the most expensive movie license ever acquired by a video games company ($35 million dollars it apparently cost), and it also undoubtedly hastened the demise of Atari Inc. as a company (as it was back then), and was also a major contributing factor in the video game market crash of 1983.

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Donkey Kong, ColecoVision

This ColecoVision conversion of Nintendo‘s classic Donkey Kong is famous for a number of reasons.

Firstly, the deal made between Coleco and Nintendo was unusual to say the least, because Nintendo were demanding a lot, and got it. Secondly, ColecoVision Donkey Kong is known for its high quality – it easily beats any other version produced at the time (except the arcade original). Thirdly, the game was never made available as a stand-alone cartridge release – it was only available as a pack-in game with the console. But it sure as hell helped sell a lot of consoles…

My only criticism of Coleco Donkey Kong is that it is missing a level. The 50m ‘Cement Factory’ level is missing and there are only three screens in this, instead of the four seen in the arcade game. In the world of tiny ROM cartridges, I guess you can’t have everything…

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donkey_Kong_(video_game)