Arnie, Commodore 64

Written by Chris Butler and published by Zeppelin Games in 1992, Arnie is an isometric scrolling shoot ’em up featuring a one-man army (unsurprisingly called Arnie), on a mission to infiltrate an enemy base and assassinate a General.

A helicopter drops Arnie on the outskirts of the camp and he must then blast the living daylights out of anything that moves, acquiring new weapons as he explores the enemy’s base. Arnie‘s path to the General is marked with arrows (which helps). Enemy soldiers will attack him along the way. If Arnie kills a red enemy soldier they will drop a more powerful weapon for him to collect and use.

Arnie‘s standard gun of choice is the infamous AR15 automatic weapon, but he can also acquire an M60 high-power light machine gun, an RPG7 rocket launcher, and a FT25 flame thrower. Each new weapon comes with a limited supply of ammunition and when this runs out he reverts back to his trusty AR15.

Arnie is given three lives to complete his mission and is awarded with an extra life every 10,000 points.

Arnie is definitely reminiscent of Ocean‘s Rambo, although in my opinion it’s better. The graphics are much better than in Rambo and the gameplay is more interesting. It’s still a mindless, straightforward shooter, though, so don’t expect anything but a leave-your-brain-at-the-door-and-blast-the-shit-out-of-everything style action game. If you like that kind of thing then this game is worth playing. Arnie even spawned a sequel – called Arnie 2 – in 1993.

More: Arnie on Wikipedia

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