Get Dexter 2, Amstrad CPC

The sequel to the classic Amstrad adventure, Get Dexter, is more of the same isometric puzzle-solving, and weird futuristic adventuring, except that this time the game world is comprised of interlinked exterior screens rather than a simple maze of rooms.

You once again take control of Dexter (or Crafton, if you’re playing the original French version), with ‘help’ (ie. hindrance) from his strange yellow sidekick, Scooter (aka “Xunk” in the French version).

In terms of the scenario: it involves Dexter travelling to the planet Kef to help the friendly alien Swappis who are under threat from their neighbours, the Stiffiens. A new religious cult has risen among the Stiffiens and a secret lies inside their temple, The Antines Building. Before Dexter can properly investigate the temple he must complete three tasks for the Swappis, to prove that they can trust him. He must heal the sick Swappis; lead an Ouak to the Protico, and appease The Great Swappi in return for ‘The Big Book‘. After doing those things Dexter should then be able to access the secret door to the inner chambers of the temple and be able to continue his investigation.

To be honest, if that sounds like a load of old bollocks to you, that’s because it probably is… That’s what I was thinking when I was reading about this game. I couldn’t find any English instructions for Get Dexter 2 so had to translate them from French, and little of it made sense. While the French do make some great video games they do often come up with a load of old nonsense for their scenarios, and Get Dexter 2 is up there with some of the most ridiculous video game storylines of all-time.

It’s fair to say that the game is even better-looking than its predecessor, with beautiful graphics, nice use of colour, and locations that exude an atmosphere of strangeness.

Gameplay is very similar to the previous game. Dexter can jump, pick up items, push and pull objects, and pick up and carry a single item. Dexter‘s alien sidekick, Scooter, is still a monumental pain in the butt; getting in the way and losing the main character vital health by getting under his feet when there are hostiles to avoid, and I still don’t understand why this little yellow bastard is even in the game. I did read that you can get Scooter to fetch items for you, but couldn’t work out how to do it. Like the previous game, Dexter only has one life and diminishing life energy. There is probably a way of replenishing his energy, but again I couldn’t find out how to do it.

I did read that Dexter can find a use a laser pistol in the sequel, but I never found it. In fact: I lost patience with this game far quicker than I with did the first game. As nice as it looks, Get Dexter 2 is frustrating and convoluted to play. And don’t get me started about that scenario…

While Get Dexter 2 does look promising it’s probably not a game that many people are going to make much progress in as the objectives are even more obscure than the first game. It’s a game that’s kind of fun to just wander around in and explore for a while, but not much fun to play properly. If you can actually work out what “properly” means…

Get Dexter 2 was published by ERE International in Europe in 1988. The original release also came with the first Get Dexter as part of the package, which was nice.

So is it as good as the original? In my opinion: no. It’s too weird and unfathomable for my liking. But it’s still a decent original game on the Amstrad CPC. Get Dexter 2 is not a video-gaming classic, as some seem to think, but it does look great and has some nice touches.

More: Get Dexter 2 on Moby Games

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