Category Archives: NES

Nintendo Entertainment System games.

Mega Man Release Timeline

Game Name, System (Release Date)

Mega Man, Famicom (17th Dec 1987)
Mega Man 2, Famicom (24th Dec 1988)
Mega Man 3, Famicom (28th Sept 1990)
Mega Man: Dr. Wily’s Revenge, Game Boy (26th July 1991)
Mega Man 4, Famicom (6th Dec 1991)
Mega Man II, Game Boy (20th Dec 1991)
Mega Man 5, Famicom (4th Dec 1992)
Mega Man III, Game Boy (11th Dec 1992)
Mega Man IV, Game Boy (29th Oct 1993)
Mega Man 6, Famicom (5th Nov 1993)
Mega Man X, SNES (17th Dec 1993)
Mega Man V, Game Boy (22nd July 1994)
Mega Man X2
, SNES (16th Dec 1994)
Mega Man 7, SNES (24th March 1995)
Mega Man X3
, SNES (1st Dec 1995)
Mega Man 8, PlayStation (17th Dec 1996)
Mega Man X4
, PlayStation (1st Aug 1997)
Mega Man X5
, PlayStation (30th Nov 2000)
Mega Man X6
, PlayStation (29th Nov 2001)
Mega Man Zero
, Game Boy Advance (26th April 2002)
Mega Man Zero 2
, Game Boy Advance (2nd May 2003)
Mega Man X7
, PlayStation 2 (17th July 2003)
Mega Man Zero 3
, Game Boy Advance (23rd April 2004)
Mega Man X: Command Mission
, GameCube (29th July 2004)
Mega Man X9
, PlayStation 2 (7th Dec 2004)
Mega Man Zero 4
, Game Boy Advance (21st April 2005)
Mega Man ZX
, Nintendo DS (6th July 2006)

Mega-Man-Logo-1

Mega Man 6, NES

Mega Man 6, released by Capcom in 1993, was the last of the Mega Man games on the Famicom/NES. The first Super Nintendo Mega Man game – Mega Man X – also came out the same year as this. Which is a bit of a shock when you compare the games side by side…

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Mega Man 5, NES

1992‘s Mega Man 5 on the Famicom/NES starts with a jaunty tune and a comic book style intro, and then after that it’s back to more of the same platform shooting.

This time Mega Man is up against Stone Man, Gravity Man, Crystal Man, Charge Man, Napalm Man, Wave Man, Star Man, and Gyro Man.

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Mega Man 4, NES

Mega Man 4 was published by Capcom for the Nintendo Famicom in 1991.

Other than a new intro sequence (still not making much sense having been badly translated into English), a new set of bad guys, and some newly-designed levels, there’s not a great deal different in this game to what has preceded it.

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Mega Man 3, NES

There are over 130 Mega Man titles, and many are essentially the same formula. That is: choose a level based on one of a number of boss enemies (usually themed, with a unique name); run and jump your way through a tortuous series of platforms and ladders to reach said boss; then whup its ass in a boss fight.

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Mega Man 2, NES

The 1988 sequel to Mega Man, Mega Man 2 is more of the same rock-hard platforming and shooting action on the Nintendo Entertainment System (aka the Famicom).

Your six major protagonists this time are: Bubble Man, Air Man, Quick Man, Heat Man, Wood Man, Metal Man, Flash Man, and Crash Man. And – as usual – each has their own themed level which you can choose from in the opening menu.

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Mega Man, NES

Known as “Rock Man” in its native Japan, Mega Man is a Nintendo Famicom game developed and published by Capcom in 1987. It is the beginning of the long-running Mega Man series.

What the first Mega Man did was establish a style of its own – for both gameplay and graphics.

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Final Fantasy III, Famicom

The third Final Fantasy game was released for the Nintendo Famicom in Japan in 1990. It wasn’t officially translated into English until many years after its initial release, so a variety of fan translations exist online, and their quality varies wildly. The TransTeam translation I found to be pretty good although the font and text alignment isn’t perfect.

The game starts with you naming four characters, and these form the basis of your party. Combat begins almost immediately and is turn-based. Thankfully it’s easy to get to grips with, if a little slow, and is quite challenging from the get-go.

One really cool thing about Final Fantasy III is that you can change the “jobs” of your party members. Choose between Fighter, Monk, Black Wizard, White Wizard, Red Wizard, and general purpose “Onion Kid” (don’t ask me…). You can change jobs at any time although you have to unequip everything you’re carrying to do it, because certain jobs can only use certain equipment. There’s a thoughtful “Remove All” option in the menu, but it’s still a pain to do.

Final Fantasy III reminds me of the classic Final Fantasy Legend on the black and white Game Boy, with its limited dialogue, ‘chibi’ character style and sentimental, warbley music. Except this time it’s in colour. And it looks and sounds lovely even to this day.

Final Fantasy III was the last of the Famicom Final Fantasy games – the baton was then taken by the Super Nintendo for the next three releases.

More: Final Fantasy III on Wikipedia

Super Mario Bros. 3, NES

Of the three Super Mario Bros. games released for the Nintendo Entertainment System, this 1988 release must surely rate as the best.

Directed by Takashi Tezuka and produced by Shigeru Miyamoto, Super Mario Bros. 3 really takes the Mario series to a whole new level, with new techniques, gimmicks, and secrets, as well as the usual high standard of finesse and charm.

Super Mario Bros. 3 forgets that Super Mario Bros. 2 ever existed and instead goes back to what made Super Mario Bros. so enjoyable to play. And that is: challenging, left to right-scrolling levels, and precise control over Mario (or Luigi – the two-player mode came back). In this game Mario could (for the first time) slide down slopes; pick up and throw special blocks; freely climb vines, and also fly, float, swim faster, and throw hammers (!) using collectable power-ups.

Individual levels form part of eight themed ‘worlds’, and a map allows you to choose which level to take on next (another new feature at the time), and although the game is still relatively linear it does at least give you the occasional alternative route. Plus: you can now see secret areas opening up on the main map, which is quite exciting (and something that we later saw expanded in the phenomenal Super Nintendo sequel to this, Super Mario World).

Super Mario Bros. 3 also introduces bonus mini-games into the mix and these allow the player to win extra lives or power-ups which can be used later during a level.

Playing it now, there is no doubting that Super Mario Bros. 3 is an amazing game that has stood the test of time well. In some respects it plays a bit like a prototype of the peerless Super Mario World, which indeed it is – a prototype of that game, albeit one that sold almost 20 million physical copies worldwide!

More: Super Mario Bros. 3 on Wikipedia

Super Mario Bros. 2, NES

The North American release of Super Mario Bros. 2 was controversial because it was not the same Super Mario Bros. 2 that was released in Japan – it was a re-skinned game; made into a Mario game, because the Nintendo bigwigs thought the original was too difficult for western gamers.

And the result is the game you see here. It looks like Mario from a distance, but when you drill down to it, there are quite a few differences. In this there is no two-player option. Players can instead choose to play each stage as one of four different characters – Mario (of course), Luigi, Toad (the mushroom), and Princess Peach. Each character can run and jump, and climb, and do all the usual Mario-style actions, but they also each have a unique ability. Mario can jump the farthest; Luigi – the highest; Peach can float, and Toad can pick up items quickly.

Also unlike the previous game: the player can explore both left and right – as well as vertically – rather than being forced to always move left to right. Enemies are no longer beaten by jumping on them. Instead: they can be ridden on by jumping on them. And if you do want/need to beat them up you have to throw objects at them instead.

Super Mario Bros. 2 contains twenty different levels in total, spread over seven themed worlds. Each world has different enemies, plus a boss battle at the end.

Although this version of Super Mario Bros. 2 has since gone on to be regarded as a bit of a retro-gaming classic, it is easy to see why it garnered some criticism at the time. It does deviate from many of the Mario conventions we’ve come to recognise, although it does retain the precise controls, cute graphics, and charm of the Mario series as a whole, so is well worth a play.

More: Super Mario Bros. 2 on Wikipedia